The British see Germany as a driver in a “vaccination war”

I amIn the United Kingdom, feelings are worsening for Germany, which is increasingly seen as the driving force behind the “vaccination war” and attacks on the kingdom. Anger over European attempts to transfer vaccines produced for Great Britain to the European Union was followed by criticism of the Robert Koch Institute’s Standing Committee on Vaccination’s recommendation not to give the vaccine developed in Oxford to people over the age of 65.

Boris Johnson assured his countrymen that the British regulatory authorities had worked meticulously and that there was no reason to doubt the efficacy of the Oxford vaccine for the elderly. It explicitly “contradicted” the representation of the German authorities. The serum has been in use in the UK for weeks. The Daily Telegraph wrote on Friday that the German reaction was “unfair to British scientists” and sparked “unnecessary annoyance” among British retirees.

‘Irresponsible business’

A government spokesman confirmed on Friday that despite threats from the European Union to impose restrictions on exports, London does not expect vaccine supplies to be cut off. Shortly before the European Union Commission published the controversial contract with Astra-Zeneca on Friday, British media reported that Health Secretary Matt Hancock had rejected a similar draft contract and had insisted on a “legally binding” handover. When asked whether the Kingdom is ready to administer doses to the European Union, the spokesman said: “The public expects us to continue vaccinating the largest possible number of people and we will.”

The government was bolstered by the clinical results of the other two vaccines. Novavax was developed in the United States but tested and produced in Great Britain, and it is said to provide 98% protection against the Coronavirus, and it is also effective against the two species that were first discovered in Kent and South Africa. The vaccine developed by Johnson & Johnson is said to be 100 percent effective even with just one dose. London ordered 60 million doses of the first vaccine and 30 million doses of the second vaccine in August. However, approvals are not expected before April. “The buying abroad and home production approach has paid off,” Hancock said.

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Meanwhile, a vaccination war is raging between London and Brussels within the kingdom. In Scotland, the government is under pressure to justify itself because the vaccination campaign is slower than in the rest of the country. Prime Minister Nicola Sturgeon, who has come under fire in the Scottish Parliament, now wants to reveal the number of renditions to Scotland. London sees this not only as a betrayal of trust, but as an unpatriotic act, because delivery volumes that are kept secret for “security reasons” could be used by the European Union in the vaccination dispute against the kingdom.

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