Robert Sanford, a Pennsylvania man accused of beating a Capitol cop with a fire extinguisher, has been charged

The Justice Department said Robert Sanford, 55, was arrested Thursday morning in Pennsylvania. Court documents state that Sanford was seen in videotaped carrying a “red body that appears to be a fire extinguisher” while climbing over a short wall on the lower west porch of the Capitol building. He allegedly threw the extinguisher at the police officers and hit one of them, who was wearing a helmet, before falling back on and wounding two others.

Officer William Young said he “felt a heavy blow on the back of his helmet,” according to court documents, and saw a fire extinguisher on the ground but did not see who had hit him. Young was evaluated in hospital and released to return to service.

The records said Sanford was identified on Tuesday by the Pennsylvania branch of the FBI and charged on Wednesday in U.S. District Court.

He faces four charges: Intentionally entering or remaining in any prohibited building or land without legal authority; Disruptive or disruptive behavior on the Capitol; Civil unrest, according to the documents, assault, resistance, or obstruction of some officers while carrying out official duties.

It was not immediately clear if he had a lawyer.

His arrest Adds to our growing list Of individuals accused in the past week Deadly riots, As a result, five people were killed, including a Capitol Police officer and a woman who was participating in the attack.

To date, more than 30 people have been arrested on federal charges, with some accused of bringing weapons to Capitol Hill, and others being filmed looting the building. Many of them are accused of illegal entry or violent entry.

Among those arrested this week alone Robert Keith Packer From Virginia, who has been identified as a man inside the Capitol wearing a sweatshirt emblazoned with the words “Camp Auschwitz” and Larry Rendel Brooke, Retired Reserve Officer in the Air Force From Texas who was photographed wandering around a Senate room holding a floppy white cuff, which law enforcement authorities use to restrict or detain people.
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