Why is the Seville tattoo fresh orange? Action

In Seville, southern Spain, the municipal water company has started a pilot project to generate methane electricity from fermented oranges.

EMASESA, a member of Aqua Publica Europe (European Association of Public Water Suppliers), is striving to achieve energy self-sufficiency in the copper wastewater treatment plant, which is already generating electricity from organic matter. The electricity surplus will be reduced by 2023.

“The project started because of Emaseza’s interest in achieving energy self-sufficiency in the urban wastewater treatment process,” said Jimmy Ballop, CEO of the company.

EMASESA strives to achieve energy self-sufficiency in the copper wastewater treatment plant

Not just an orange fruit

In this way, plants such as the 13 GW Cupro wastewater treatment plant will achieve nearly 95% self-sufficiency by 2020, the CEO said. “Given treatment capacity, location and modernity, Covero wastewater treatment plant could be an important environmental center,” he said.

“The current challenge facing EMASESA is to get Koppero to outperform other wastewater treatment plants over other wastewater treatment plants,” he says, adding that the average self-sufficiency rate for the four largest operating EMASESA plants is 70%.

The city collects 5.7 million kilograms of fruit on the street during the winter from 48,000 trees in the city and generates 35 tons (39 tons) of clean energy to power the Edar Copero Corporation. The city council employs about 200 people to collect fruit.

Then 35 tons of juice is extracted to generate electricity from the biogas, while the peel is fertilized and converted into fertilizer for use in agriculture. Paul explained that during the cleaning process, the organic matter is stabilized in the wastewater by anaerobic digestion, producing a methane-rich biogas (65%) that is used in CHP engines as a fuel to generate electricity.

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The plant is expected to generate about 1,500 kilowatts of electricity, which corresponds to the consumption of 150 households. To achieve this, the city needs to invest 250,000 (10310,000).

The tests will produce 1,000 kilowatts and 50 kilowatts, enough to power five homes every day. If all of the oranges in the city were recycled and planted, 73,000 families could be supplied with electricity.

The region produces around 15,000 tons of oranges, but most of the region’s fruit is exported to the UK, where it is produced under mysterious circumstances.

Orange for the Round Economy

Seville has also implemented an organic waste collection system launched by Container, an urban waste management company, with 340 containers installed in the city and 340,000 e-cards available to the public.

The mayor’s representative, DW, said the city plans to collect selected organic waste, increase recycling rates, increase public awareness of waste management and reduce waste to landfill.

This process consumes about 65% of the energy in a city water cycle. Ballop said self-sufficiency in wastewater treatment plants is a clear step towards mitigating the effects of climate change.

Spain has submitted plans to convert its entire electrical system to completely renewable sources by 2050.

The country’s draft bill on climate and energy change will cut greenhouse gas emissions by 90% compared to 1990 levels.

“EMASESA is developing a guide to encourage other companies in the water sector to increase gas production by coding organic waste and doubling this activity in other companies and cities,” Palop said.

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