May 19, 2024

Bad neighbors of tomatoes reduce the harvest

  1. Giessen General
  2. advisor
  3. residence

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Some plants repel pests near tomatoes. Others steal nutrients or easily infect them with diseases, putting the harvest at risk.

If the plants have the same requirements for the site and soil, they can be grown, e.g Ideally socialize with perennial family. from tomatoes You can expect a good harvest, but you should take a careful look when choosing companion plants. Especially when they have the same needs, you can compete with tomatoes and slow down their growth.

Poor bed neighbors take away nutrients or space from tomatoes

Combining tomatoes with the wrong companion plants can result in stunted growth and reduced yields. © ShopChop/Imago

Tomatoes are heavy eaters and require a lot of nutrients. This also applies to vegetables such as potatoes and peas, so tomatoes can suffer very little in their area if they are not provided with enough fertilizer. Others secrete growth-inhibiting substances through the roots that affect the tomato plant. Potatoes, for example, can cause such diseases It is susceptible to late blight and infects tomatoesTherefore they should not be planted at a distance in the same bed as tomatoes.

These plants should not keep tomatoes in a container or bed:

  • option
  • fennel
  • Eggplant
  • Physalis
  • love
  • sunflower
  • Salafi
  • Jerusalem artichoke
  • potato
  • Peas
  • Beet roots

You can find more exciting garden topics in the regular newsletter from our partner 24garten.de.

A harmonious mixed culture with tomatoes is possible

Just because they are poor neighbors doesn't always mean that growing up together is taboo. If they are heavy feeders, you can counter them with enough fertilizer. You should also leave enough space between plants and it is best to place companion plants in the gaps What are tomatoes actually useful for?: Marigolds, amaranth, basil, leeks and onions (Allium), for example, keep away pests such as whiteflies or aphids.

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