Always well dressed throughout your life

Prince Philip wears a brown suit in 1974 (Image: Getty Images)

Prince Philip, who has been overwhelmed by his wife, Queen Elizabeth II, can be accused of numerous diplomatic interruptions and offensive slogans. But never about not being well dressed.

“It was Prince Philip The a leg. He knew that. Matt Smith, who played Prince Philip in the Netflix series “The Crown,” said in a statement: “99 years and more, but what a whole long life.” “And what a style!” The actor added. On Netflix, with Smith on The role of the prince, the last point is not frequently clarified – many important moments and conversations occur between Prince Philip and his wife, Queen Elizabeth II, when the two get dressed or undressed.The amount of care that has gone into the Prince’s clothes is evident in the carefully tied collars, shirts and undershirts. accurately.

And could Matt Smith embody Prince Philip’s gait so well without the slightly pleated pants and double-breasted suits that distinguished him in the 1950s? it’s improbably. However, the appearance of Prince Philip in his long life may not have been sufficiently appreciated. This is mainly due to the fact that his goal (maybe not publicly announced, but nonetheless obvious and totally fulfilled) was getting into the background, to let his wife shine. And it always looks appropriate.

Prince Philip peering westward in Canada in 1951 (Image: Getty Images)

Prince Philip peering westward in Canada in 1951 (Image: Getty Images)

Not chameleon style, but always appropriate, well dressed

A proper description of “dressed up” is probably the best description of Prince Phillips’ style. He can be accused of numerous diplomatic interruptions and offensive slogans, but he is never accused of not wearing the right clothes. Adhere to the term “fitness”: The Queen Elizabeth II man stood not only for the classic British style that was often cited, but also for the fact that his appearance has been repeatedly adapted to different occasions and circumstances. Of course, Prince Philip wasn’t an elegant chameleon, but he didn’t stick to the stricter dress code either. Or at least he interpreted it to himself (halfway) freely.

In Scotland, Queen Elizabeth II's husband always wore a kilt to formal occasions.  Image credit: Getty Images

In Scotland, Queen Elizabeth II’s husband always wore a kilt to formal occasions. Image credit: Getty Images

For example, as a Marine, two years before his wedding to the future Queen, he wore a shaggy long beard in his uniform – an attentive statement that was reprehensible at the time, but widespread within the Navy. So the prince could and wanted to look like this, too. Or when he and his wife visited Ottawa, Canada in 1951, Prince Philip naturally wore wide-leg jeans, a scarf and a checkered shirt – not in disguise, but as a western hero from one of the popular movies of the time. When the royal couple went to one of the royal couple’s favorite places, specifically Balmoral in Scotland, the king naturally wore a skirt (and thus a shorter skirt than his wife).

Jackets and trousers were allowed

“Incompatible” jackets and pants were allowed to be worn with the Prince. Image credit: Getty Images

Manufacturer Kinloch Anderson, which has been around since 1868, was responsible for his set of drippers; The Prince’s suits – which he is especially remembered for in terms of style – came from the iconic London Savile Row, and above all from the tailoring company. Eddie and Ravenscroft. It was a long-time tailor, John N. Kent, responsible for personal adjustments. The prince’s shirts are said to have always come from Stevens Brothers and the shoes from the centuries-old John Loop shoe maker. His navy uniforms came from Davies & Son and Gieves & Hawkes.

Sewing house Gieves & Hawkes was in charge of Prince Philip's navy uniform (here on a state visit to Bremerhaven in 1978).  Image credit: Getty Images

Sewing house Gieves & Hawkes was in charge of Prince Philip’s navy uniform (here on a state visit to Bremerhaven in 1978). Image credit: Getty Images

Allowances are transferable

So Prince Philip was a loyal customer. Of course, his changability was not apparent in the aforementioned uniform, but he was in suits. It is these that make him, later on, a symbol of elegance and an inspiration for many. On the one hand, there are the cuts that have gone along with and challenged the zeitgeist. In the 1950s, when he made his debut with Queen Elizabeth II, their trousers were often wide, with a delicate fold, and the jackets were often wide and buttoned. It is a form of a suit that the Prince remained loyal to, even in the 1960s, when the suits actually got tighter.

Wide cut and double button: a typical suit that Prince Philip wore in the 1950s.  Image credit: Getty Images

Wide cut and double button: a typical suit that Prince Philip wore in the 1950s. Image credit: Getty Images

In the 1970s, when men’s fashion suddenly got a little more glamorous, Prince Philip’s suits looked very contemporary, yes, even somewhat groundbreaking. Just like the things he was wearing, which would be interpreted today as “the essence of the hut.” For a custom-tailored tweed jacket (especially in the 1970s and 1980s) he would occasionally combine beige corduroy pants and suede chuka shoes, as well as oversized aviator sunglasses. The royal and contemporary look is finished at the same time.

Turn the cottage at its best: the husband of the British Queen of 1984 in

Heart of the Cottage at its Best: The Queen’s Husband in 1984 at the Royal Windsor Horse Show. Image credit: Getty Images

The adaptability of Prince Philips clothing is also expressed in other aspects. On the one hand, there are the materials: even at high temperatures he wore suits with great indifference – because they were then made from the appropriate material, for example a mixture of silk and linen. On the other hand, there were combinations: for Prince Philip, the suit was not just a suit – according to the Italian “Spezzato” principle, he often wore a jacket and pants Misfit, So in a different color or pattern.

Prince Philip in 1964 after one of his beloved polo games.  Image credit: Getty Images

Prince Philip in 1964 after one of his beloved polo games. Image credit: Getty Images

The prince was also famous for his sportswear. He loved hockey, cricket and polo. In this context, his off-court photos, when he combined the typical trousers and sports shirts with his other wardrobe, are particularly interesting in style. So, for example, white high-cut pants, on top of which he then donned an olive green Barbour jacket. Or when he’s wearing a classic gray knitted jacket with rubber hunting shoes. Classics, like the Prince, adapt perfectly.

For all this, Prince Philip at the age of 94 in 2016 was ranked 12th among the “50 Best Dressed Men in Great Britain” of the British “GQ” (his grandson Prince Harry, on the other hand, was ranked only 38) . When CNN asked him recently after Prince Phillips’ death, what was the reason for the high rank of king, he said, “His eye is on the details and he’s always dressed as a gentleman. He always had the gift of looking the right fit.” Just right.

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