These are koala bears rescue men

DrThe ubiquitous contagion between koalas, smoldering forest fires, drought, deforestation and urban invasion are some of the many devastating forces that continue to threaten their survival. A government report in June 2020 warned that these forces could cause Australia’s famous animal to go extinct in New South Wales – the most populous state – by 2050.


The trees stand in a habitat inhabited by koalas in the Great Blue Mountains World Heritage Area, near Belbin.
:


Photo: Jill Graalo / Reuters

“They are, in fact, at risk of extinction in our lifetimes,” Philpott says of the New South Wales koala population, at a veterinary clinic on the outskirts of Sydney. In his spare time, the Australian nurse dedicates himself to sick koalas with some volunteers.

Philpott collects leaves that koalas feed on during rehab.


Philpott collects leaves that koalas feed on during rehab.
:


Photo: Lauren Elliott / Reuters

“If the areas that didn’t burn last year were burning this year, it would be really catastrophic,” says Philpott, the nation’s largest animal rescue organization at the request of his daughter. Wildlife Information, Rescue, and Education Service, WIRES for short, join up. “The fires of the future may mean the end of them.”

A sick koala named Wally who was rescued by WIRES is being treated at the University of Sydney Veterinary Teaching Hospital.


A sick koala named Wally who was rescued by WIRES is being treated at the University of Sydney Veterinary Teaching Hospital.
:


Photo: Lauren Elliott / Reuters

Mother of a koala named Gladys with her twin cubs who have been medically diagnosed as being underweight.


Mother of a koala named Gladys with her twin cubs who have been medically diagnosed as being underweight.
:


Photo: Lauren Elliott / Reuters

Wali is treating.


Wali is treating.
:


Photo: Lauren Elliott / Reuters

A survey of koalas and a sick wali.


A survey of koalas and a sick wali.
:


Photo: Lauren Elliott / Reuters

The worst summer forest fire in a generation destroyed more than 11.2 million acres, nearly half the size of the United Kingdom, placing gray tree marsupials at the center of the national debate and becoming a hot political issue.

In New South Wales, at least 5,000 koalas have died in fires that have burned 80 percent of the Blue Mountains World Heritage Site and 24 percent of the koala’s habitat is on public lands, according to a government report released in June.

As another summer approaches, koalas are at risk of more wildfires, although forecasters are expecting a few wetter and cooler months than last year.

Team members from Science for Wildlife, a non-profit conservation organization, are using a wireless tracking device to locate koalas.


Team members from Science for Wildlife, a non-profit conservation organization, are using a wireless tracking device to locate koalas.
:


Photo: Lauren Elliott / Reuters

A rescued koala named Robin is being treated for cataracts under sedation at the Animal Eye Clinic (ECA), a veterinary clinic that specializes in ophthalmology.


A rescued koala named Robin is being treated for cataracts under sedation at the Animal Eye Clinic (ECA), a veterinary clinic that specializes in ophthalmology.
:


Photo: Lauren Elliott / Reuters

Christopher Sun is a resident anesthesiologist and a resident veterinarian holds a Wally who is undergoing anesthesia.


Christopher Sun is a resident anesthesiologist and a resident veterinarian holds a Wally who is undergoing anesthesia.
:


Photo: Lauren Elliott / Reuters

The koalas have been treated successfully and are in good health again.


The koalas have been treated successfully and are in good health again.
:


Photo: Lauren Elliott / Reuters

Return to the natural habitat.


Return to the natural habitat.
:


Photo: Lauren Elliott / Reuters

Koala conservationists, who blame climate change for so many wildfires, are focusing on cities, as population growth in urban areas such as Sydney is increasing demand for deforestation and home space. Road safety signs now appear in developed suburbs warning of the danger of koalas crossing the street.

Urban development is interfering more and more with the habitats of koalas.


Urban development is interfering more and more with the habitats of koalas.
:


Photo: Lauren Elliott / Reuters

“There has to be a balance to ensure the survival of these species,” says Tracy, a WIRES volunteer.

Mother of a koala with her little baby.


Mother of a koala with her little baby.
:


Photo: Lauren Elliott / Reuters

READ  Department of Justice, Federal Court System Damaged by a Russian Hack

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *