May 24, 2024

How intestinal flora and asthma are linked – healing practice

The effects of intestinal flora on health should not be underestimated and intestinal bacteria also appear to play an important role in asthma. Certain bacteria are significantly more common in people with asthma and are associated with increased markers of inflammation in nasal secretions.

In a recent study, a Brazilian research team examined the composition of the gut microbiome and inflammatory markers in nasal secretions in individuals with and without asthma. Results in “Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology“Posted.

Asthma is a complex disease

The researchers explained that asthma is a complex disease and can be traced back to interactions between genetic background and environmental influences. The intestinal flora is also hypothesized to be linked to the development of asthma.

This is what was published recently Review paper A link between intestinal flora and asthma has already been established, although the focus has been primarily on the fungi that live in the intestines. The question in the study conducted by the Brazilian research team was to what extent intestinal bacteria also play a role.

To clarify the potential relationship between the gut microbiome and asthma, the researchers analyzed the composition of the gut microbiome using stool samples from 29 children and adolescents with asthma and 28 children without asthma. They also examined the cytokine profile in the participants' nasal secretions.

To clarify the potential relationship between the gut microbiome and asthma, the research team analyzed the composition of the gut microbiome using stool samples in 29 children and adolescents with asthma and 28 children without asthma. They also examined the cytokine profile in the participants' nasal secretions.

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Significant differences in intestinal flora

According to the researchers, there were significant differences in gut bacteria between asthmatic and non-asthmatic participants.

In particular, bacteria from the genus Bacteroides were more common in participants with asthma, while Prevotella bacteria were more common in people without asthma, the team reported.

The relative frequency of Bacteroides also correlates with the concentration of the cytokine interleukin-4 in nasal secretion in participants with asthma.

Alteration of fatty acid biosynthesis

The researchers explained that evaluating the functional capacity of intestinal flora revealed evidence of a difference in the biosynthesis of fatty acids in people with asthma compared to those without asthma.

Since short-chain fatty acids produced by intestinal bacteria such as acetate, propionate, and butyrate are known to have a significant impact on our health, this altered fatty acid biosynthesis could explain the relationship between intestinal flora and asthma. This now needs to be clarified in future studies. (FP)

Author and source information

This text conforms to the requirements of the medical literature, medical guidelines and current studies and has been vetted by medical professionals.

sources:

  • Bianca Sampaio Doto Fiosa, Candice Machado de Andrade, Pedro Millet Meirelles, Mauricio L Barreto, Neil Pierce, Camila Alexandrina Figueiredo: Gut microbiome signature and markers of nasal lavage inflammation in young asthmatics; In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology (published March 9, 2024), jaci-global.org
  • Amjad N. Kang, Joseph H. Skalski: Gut fungi and asthma; In: Fungi Journal (published March 1, 2024), mdpi.com

important note:
This article contains general advice only and should not be used for self-diagnosis or treatment. It cannot replace a visit to the doctor.

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