Sophie Tyber Arp at Tate Modern Abbey

Artist Sophie Tauber Arp’s work can be seen in London as of today. The Tate Gallery of Modern Art said this is the UK’s first retrospective of Swiss women. Taeuber-Arp is one of the most important abstract artists and designers of the 1920s and 1930s. “Your interdisciplinary work has a lasting impact and inspires innovative artists and designers around the world.”

Six spaces with four small crosses, 1932 / Kunstmuseum Bern

Taeuber-Arp, who died in Zurich in 1943, was extraordinarily creative and diverse. “I made embroidery and paintings, carved sculptures, published magazines, and made dolls and the mystical things of Dada.” And in doing so, she combined traditional craftsmanship with modern abstraction, challenging the boundaries between art and design, the Museum continues.

Dolls, furniture and fashion

Taeuber-Arp is known for its paintings, engravings, and sculptures. But the wife of Franco-German artist Hans Arp also worked with textiles and doll making and worked as an interior designer, designing furniture and stained glass as well as costumes, bags and necklaces. Her comprehensive portfolio reflects her autobiography.

Born in 1889 in the Alpine city of Davos, she studied art and design, trained in dance, made theater and puppet sets, and later taught how to work with textiles. The exhibition, organized by Tate Modern with the Kunstmuseum Basel and the Museum of Modern Art, can be seen in London until 17 October.

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