NASA’s video shows two massive blasts on the sun – particles could hit Earth | Science | News

The Sun welcomed the New Year by releasing magnetic strings from the Southern Hemisphere. The eruptions occurred on January 2, setting off an explosion of energy that could hit the Earth. NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory photographed the Sun’s particles as they were falling into deep space.

A short burst can be seen around the six-second mark from the video, followed by another 11-second explosion.

Experts said the flares were caused by the accumulation of magnetic filaments deep inside the Sun’s core.

When the filaments accumulate enough, they release a coronal ejection mass (CME) in the solar system.

According to the Space Weather astronomy website, particles are flying through the solar system and could hit Earth in the coming days.

The site said: “On January 2, 2021, two dark strands of magnetism erupted in the southern hemisphere of the sun.

This movie from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory captures both.

“The double eruption threw a close pair of coronal masses projected toward the ground. The first eruption was slow, and the second was faster.

“This could cause two CMEs to build up one on top of the other, intensifying their impact. NOAA Prediction Models indicate reaching Earth on January 6th.”

Read more: The Space Observatory captures an unusual photo of sunspots

The solar wind can heat the Earth’s outer atmosphere, causing it to expand.

This could affect satellites in orbit, which could lead to a lack of GPS navigation, mobile phone signal, and satellite channels such as Sky.

In addition, particle eruption can lead to high currents in the magnetosphere, which can lead to higher than normal electricity in power lines, resulting in electrical transformers and power stations to explode and power losses.

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Rarely does an event like this happen, with the arrival of the biggest solar storm disrupting the technology in 1859, when an increase in electricity during what is now known as the Carrington Event was so strong that telegraph systems broke down across Europe.

There were also reports that some buildings were set ablaze as a result of the electrical current.

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