Great Britain surpasses Germany in terms of access

What the law regulates there for many years, and thus has not caused the British economy to stall, should not be feasible or unreasonable for the economy, especially in the opinion of many European Union members in Germany.

Chris Lawton On Unsplash

“Accessibility regulations in Great Britain: What the law is there and it doesn’t seem to work in Germany” is the title of a 17-minute YouTube video Interviews With a journalist and disability rights activist Christian Link from London.

She grew up in Germany and has lived in London for several years, partly due to her easy accessibility. For what has been law in Great Britain for many years to become a reality in Germany, Bundestag members still have time to pass a good accessibility bill in this legislative period.

“I thought I would only stay in the UK for six months, then decided relatively quickly that I wanted to stay in London – one reason was the ease of access (…) I had a feeling that my quality of life was generally improving – and it depended to an extent Big on accessibility, “says Christian Link.

She grew up in Palatinate, worked for the German news agency in Hamburg for a long time and then moved to the BBC in London. Meanwhile, she worked for a railroad company, where she was responsible for accessibility.

One important reason Christian Link lives unimpeded in Great Britain is that the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) was passed there as early as 1995 and improved by the Equality Act in 2010. The effects of this law on offers and services available to the public , Including those in the private sector, are those that in Great Britain enable persons with disabilities to have a much greater degree of participation and to be granted specific rights.

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What the law regulates there for many years, and thus has not caused the British economy to stall, should not be feasible or unreasonable for the economy, especially in the opinion of many European Union members in Germany.

This is why the bill to boost access to the federal government is so flat. So, it is worth looking at countries like Great Britain, but also Austria, where what is possible is what should not be possible in this country when the Federal Parliament soon debates and decides on the Accessibility Enhancement Act.

Link to Ottmar Miles Ball’s interview with Christian Link

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