Commonwealth: Prince Charles pretends to be moral authority

The party’s political neutrality

Gestures are carefully examined to see if members of the royal family can associate a statement with them. Was it a criticism of British refugee policy that the famous children’s book character Paddington Bear, who according to her story is a Peruvian refugee, drank tea with the Queen in a film marking her jubilee? The fact that Charles shook up the program of the Conservative government somewhat relentlessly was also seen by some as a sign of discontent.

The kingdom is anxiously awaiting whether King Charles III. He will try to change the rules of what can be said to the monarch, as his friend and biographer Jonathan Dimbleby suggested a few years ago. Dimbleby said at the time that such a move would mean “a seismic shift in the sovereign’s role”. Charles himself later spoke more cautiously and emphasized the neutrality of his political party.

“Come to Dance Meticulously” at the Palace

Criticism of the British refugee plans, which was not denied by Clarence House, Charles’s residence, could now point in a different direction. “Get ready for King Charles, the King who speaks his mind,” columnist Simon Jenkins commented in the Guardian. “It will not change.”

Recently, Charles has tried to give himself a more modern image. Together with his wife, Duchess Camilla, he appeared in the popular evening series “EastEnders”, in the ballroom at Buckingham Palace, the broadcast of the dance show “Strictly Come Dancing” will be recorded – perhaps even with Charles and Camilla as dancers.

But constitutional experts remain quiet. Charles is not the first heir to the throne to break the norms. Ultimately when he was king, he was surrounded by a web of unwritten rituals, traditions, and laws.

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