Sore Throat

It is a very attractive website built using wonderful features based in Wordpress. It is an informative health care blog regarding:

Simvastatin

You can learn more about Simvastatin or Zocor which treats triglyceride and high cholesterol levels in blood. You might need medical attention for Simvastatin side effects.

Atenolol

As a beta blocker Atenolol is a drug used primarily in cardiovascular diseases. Be careful! Please be informed about Atenolol side effects.

Metoprolol

It is a receptor blocker used in treatment of several diseases of the cardiovascular system, especially hypertension. Metoprolol side effects must be considered for this drug.

Yaz

Known also as Yasmin is used for ovulation prevention. Before taking it, read Yaz side effects.

Zoloft

Also known as Sertraline is an antidepressant of the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor. Consider the related topics:

Do not forget to read also Zoloft side effects since it is well described.

Lisinopril

It is used in treatment of hypertension. Before using Lisinopril please refer to Lisinopril side effects to avoid heart problems.

Menu 

Bhutan’s Royal Education Council visits Weston

On Tuesday, March 26, members of the Royal Education Council of Bhutan met with administrators from Weston High School. Back row from left are Dolma Yangdon (high school student from Bhutan), Assistant Principals Michael Marotto and Dan Doak, Principal Lisa Wolak, and Superintendent Colleen Palmer. Seated from left, Sonam Tenzin, Weston High School student Julian Jacobs, Namgay Wangchuk, Sonam Wangyel, Lhundup Dukpa, and Tandin Wangmo.

On Tuesday, March 26, members of the Royal Education Council of Bhutan met with administrators from Weston High School. Back row from left are Dolma Yangdon (high school student from Bhutan), Assistant Principals Michael Marotto and Dan Doak, Principal Lisa Wolak, and Superintendent Colleen Palmer. Seated from left, Sonam Tenzin, Weston High School student Julian Jacobs, Namgay Wangchuk, Sonam Wangyel, Lhundup Dukpa, and Tandin Wangmo.

Weston got a special treat when visitors from the Himalayas, 7,500 miles away, came to town.

Members of the Royal Education Council of Bhutan (REC) visited Weston High School on Tuesday, March 26, to meet with administrators to discuss education and the possibility of establishing a future student exchange program.

The idea to introduce Weston to the council came from Julian Jacobs, a Weston High School junior, who did an internship with the REC in Bhutan last year.

“Bhutan is a very interesting country that not many people know much about. So I think it would be great to establish an exchange program between Weston and Bhutan,” Julian said.

Members of the Royal Education Council of Bhutan (RTE) visiting Weston included from left, Sonam Nima (head of administration and finance), Namgay Wangchuk (senior program officer), Lhundup Dukpa (program director), Dr. Sonam Wangyei Wang (director of REC), Julian Jacobs (Weston High School junior), Tandin Wangmo (REC development officer).

Members of the Royal Education Council of Bhutan (RTE) visiting Weston included from left, Sonam Nima (head of administration and finance), Namgay Wangchuk (senior program officer), Lhundup Dukpa (program director), Dr. Sonam Wangyei Wang (director of REC), Julian Jacobs (Weston High School junior), and Tandin Wangmo (REC development officer).

The delegation visiting Weston included several members of the REC and a student from Bhutan.

When the group arrived early in the morning, they were greeted by high school administrators under a special banner in the main lobby. The council gave a presentation to 60 Weston students and then engaged in an educational discussion with the district administration, school board, and curriculum instructional leaders.

Weston High School Principal Lisa Wolak said it was an honor to host the Royal Education Council. “The members were very gracious in answering all of our questions about Bhutan. We are exploring the possibility of developing a connection with a school similar to what we now have with our Chinese sister school,” she said.

Bhutan

Bhutan is a landlocked state in South Asia, located at the eastern end of the Himalayas. It is bordered by China and India. Its capital and largest city is Thimphu.

Julian Jacobs at Bumthang Tzong, Bhutan.

Julian Jacobs at Bumthang Tzong, Bhutan.

Its landscape ranges from subtropical plains in the south to subalpine Himalayan heights in the north, where some peaks exceed 23,000 feet.

Bhutan’s state religion is Vajrayana Buddhism, but laws allow freedom of religion.

In 2008, Bhutan made the transition from an absolute monarchy to a constitutional monarchy and now holds elections for officials. Bhutan is a member of the United Nations.

Its national dress is a kimono, the national sport is archery, and its economy is based on agriculture, forestry, tourism, and the sale of hydroelectric power to India.

Getting to and touring Bhutan is an experience in and of itself. Julian explained that to get to Thimphu, the airport was an hour drive away, and then it was necessary to climb up a mountain. “On the highways there are cows walking, and they aren’t allowed to be disturbed, so you wait patiently for them to move, he said.

In the summertime, Julian saw many tents set up along the highway because that is monsoon season and it rains a lot, so workers stay in tents along the roads to keep the highways functional.

“The people in Bhutan are very nice. They aren’t rude and they treat others with respect,” Julian said.

Gross National Happiness

One of the things that is most different about Bhutan from American culture is its political system called Gross National Happiness (GNH).

While there is no exact quantitative definition of GNH, it refers to the measurement of the quality of life. “Weston students were especially interested in the concept of Gross National Happiness,” said Ms. Wolak.

Julian Jacobs,second from right, visited the government buildings in Thimphu, Bhutan with, from left, Chencho Lhamu, program director of the Royal Education Council, Dr. Sonam Wangyel Wang, REC Director, and his father Dr. Brian Jacobs, chairman of Akadémos.

Julian Jacobs,second from right, visited the government buildings in Thimphu, Bhutan with, from left, Chencho Lhamu, program director of the Royal Education Council, Dr. Sonam Wangyel Wang, REC Director, and his father Dr. Brian Jacobs, chairman of Akadémos.

Julian said during his internship with the REC in Bhutan he learned a lot about GNH.

There are four pillars that govern GNH: The promotion of sustainable development, preservation and promotion of cultural values, conservation of the natural environment, and establishment of good governance.

The pillars are broken down further to domains of happiness: Psychological, mental and spiritual well being, living standards and happiness, good governance, health, education, community vitality, cultural diversity and resilience, time use, and ecological diversity.

“GNH is extremely specific to Bhutan and targets Bhutanese people,” Julian said. “It helps illustrate what their culture is all about,” he said.

As a result of the GNH philosophy, Julian said Bhutanese people are very free-spirited, environmentally conscious, and interesting to be around.

For his internship, Julian stayed in Thimphu for a week and then traveled 12 hours away to a boarding school in Punakha, where he interacted with Bhutanese students. “Education is not as much a priority in Bhutan as it is here, especially in rural areas,” Julian said.

Because the country is so remote, computer availability and access is extremely limited, so western culture is very much a mystery to many young people in Bhutan. He said students were very curious about America and asked him a lot of questions.

Julian Jacobs, center, poses with students in Bhutan.

Julian Jacobs, center, poses with students in Bhutan.

He noticed a big difference between city and rural towns in Bhutan. “Students in Thimphu who went to modern schools were more Westernized and were fans of Lady Gaga and Eminem. Not so much in the rural schools,” Julian said.

He thinks Bhutanese students would love Weston and vice versa. “I’ve done a lot of traveling and been to many places and what I found in Bhutan is you didn’t have to try to be immersed in their culture. You found yourself comfortable. Rather, they adapted to you and you didn’t have to struggle to fit in,” he said.

While there were language issue to overcome, Julian said he made friends easily and keeps in touch with 50 students from Bhutan, 10 on Facebook.

Julian first got interested in Bhutan from his father Brian Jacobs who has a friend who knows the director of the REC. Julian said he then applied to be an intern to learn more about Bhutan’s education system. He plans to do another internship in Bhutan this summer.

“I think Bhutanese kids would love Weston. It’s expensive and there are visa issues to deal with so I am trying to find ways to fund a program that would allow Bhutanese students to come to America,” he said.

He also thinks Weston kids would also love visiting Bhutan. “Once I show them pictures they are really interested in it,” he said.

About author

By participating in the comments section of this site you are agreeing to our Privacy Policy and User Agreement

© Hersam Acorn. All rights reserved. The Weston Forum, 16 Bailey Avenue, Ridgefield, CT 06877

Designed by WPSHOWER

Powered by WordPress